Left Over Wedding Cake



Do you know where the tradition of having a three layered wedding cake came from? Well, ‘back in the day’ it was customary to have the bottom layer for serving at the wedding, the middle layer for distributing after the wedding (for guests to take home) and the top layer was saved for a christening.

May couples today still freeze their top layer and save it for the christening of their first child. However, as the variety of wedding cakes is growing, cake makers are becoming more inventive and couples are becoming more intent on having original cakes that match their wedding theme, three layered cakes are actually becoming less and less common at wedding receptions around Australia.



The two layered cake is making a comeback with couples often keeping the top layer to have on their first wedding anniversary. Another fast growing event that is becoming a popular tradition is the post wedding party that is held after the married couple return from their honeymoon. This party (or more often a semi-formal dinner) is a thank you to family and friends, and the left over cake is often served as dessert.



How to Freeze Left Over Wedding Cake



Cake is best frozen if it has not yet been cut, so if possible and if you have a multi-layed cake, instruct your reception venue keep a whole layer uncut for freezing.



The first step is to freeze the cake solid. To do this, do not attempt to wrap or package the cake in any way, just allow ample room around it so that the decoration isn’t destroyed. A large cake box or plastic container is ideal.



After a few days the cake should be frozen solid. Now you will need to prepare it for deep freeze. Now that the cake and decorations are frozen it should be easier to handle without damaging the cake. You should wrap it in a layer of wax paper, then plastic wrap and then tin foil.



Additional tips:



* Sponge type cakes can only be frozen for approximately three months. More dense cake mixtures such as mud cake and fruit cake can be frozen for much longer, even years!
Don’t use a frost free freezer if possible as the defrosting and refreezing cycles can withdraw the moisture from the cake. A deep freezer is the best option.
Allow the cake to thaw in the fridge for up to 48 hours before unwrapping.
Allow the cake to rest at room temperature for a few hours before eating.

This is general advice only, you should consult your cake maker for any additional instructions they may have for freezing the particular cake that they have made you.